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Music Matters / Blue Note

Horace Silver Quintet – Song For My Father (Cantiga Para Meu Pai) | 45rpm 2LP

$85.00

Music Matters / Blue Note

Horace Silver Quintet – Song For My Father (Cantiga Para Meu Pai) | 45rpm 2LP

$85.00

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“As a pianist, composer and bandleader, Horace Silver practically originated and certainly was the symbol of funky jazz. His playing looked beyond Bud Powell to church music, the blues and his Cape Verde musical heritage. Silver's songs were catchy, soulful and consistently stuck in one's memory. And his bands, featuring a trumpet and tenor front line, always had a sound that was definitive of hard bop. But even with Silver's string of brilliant recordings for Blue Note, Song For My Father stands apart from the rest. The title cut became a much-covered standard as soon as this record was released, Joe Henderson's "The Kicker" also caught on, and every selection (including Silver's passionate ballad "Lonely Woman") is filled with Horace Silver's charm, wit and soul. No music collection is complete without this jazz classic.” - Music Matters

“One of Blue Note's greatest mainstream hard bop dates, Song for My Father is Horace Silver's signature LP and the peak of a discography already studded with classics. Silver was always a master at balancing jumping rhythms with complex harmonies for a unique blend of earthiness and sophistication, and Song for My Father has perhaps the most sophisticated air of all his albums. Part of the reason is the faintly exotic tint that comes from Silver's flowering fascination with rhythms and modes from overseas -- the bossa nova beat of the classic "Song for My Father," for example, or the Eastern-flavored theme of "Calcutta Cutie," or the tropical-sounding rhythms of "Que Pasa?" Subtle touches like these alter Silver's core sound just enough to bring out its hidden class, which is why the album has become such a favorite source of upscale ambience.” - AllMusic

Musicians:

Tracks: 1-2, 4-5:

  • Horace Silver, piano
  • Joe Henderson, tenor sax
  • Carmell Jones, trumpet
  • Teddy Smith, bass
  • Roger Humphries, drums

Tracks 3, 6:

  • Horace Silver, piano
  • Blue Mitchell, trumpet
  • Junior Cook, tenor sax
  • Gene Taylor, bass
  • Roy Brooks, drums

 

About Horace Silver:

“From the perspective of the early 2000s, it is clear that few jazz musicians have had a greater impact on the contemporary mainstream than Horace Silver. The hard bop style that Silver pioneered in the '50s is now dominant, played not only by holdovers from an earlier generation, but also by fuzzy-cheeked musicians who had yet to be born when the music fell out of critical favor in the '60s and '70s.

Silver's earliest musical influence was the Cape Verdean folk music he heard from his Portuguese-born father. Later, after he had begun playing piano and saxophone as a high schooler, Silver came under the spell of blues singers and boogie-woogie pianists, as well as boppers like Thelonious Monk and Bud Powell. In 1950, Stan Getz played a concert in Hartford, CT, with a pickup rhythm section that included Silver, drummer Walter Bolden, and bassist Joe Calloway. So impressed was Getz, he hired the whole trio. Silver had been saving his money to move to New York anyway; his hiring by Getz sealed the deal.

Silver worked with Getz for a year, then began to freelance around the city with such big-time players as Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young, and Oscar Pettiford. In 1952, he recorded with Lou Donaldson for the Blue Note label; this date led him to his first recordings as a leader. In 1953, he joined forces with Art Blakey to form a cooperative under their joint leadership. The band's first album, Horace Silver and the Jazz Messengers, was a milestone in the development of the genre that came to be known as hard bop. Many of the tunes penned by Silver for that record -- "The Preacher," "Doodlin'," "Room 608" -- became jazz classics. By 1956, Silver had left the Messengers to record on his own. The series of Blue Note albums that followed established Silver for all time as one of jazz's major composer/pianists. LPs like Blowin' the Blues Away and Song for My Father (both recorded by an ensemble that included Silver's longtime sidemen Blue Mitchell and Junior Cook) featured Silver's harmonically sophisticated and formally distinctive compositions for small jazz ensemble.

Silver's piano style -- terse, imaginative, and utterly funky -- became a model for subsequent mainstream pianists to emulate. Some of the most influential horn players of the '50s, '60s, and '70s first attained a measure of prominence with Silver -- musicians like Donald Byrd, Woody Shaw, Joe Henderson, Benny Golson, and the Brecker Brothers all played in Silver's band at a point early in their careers. Silver has even affected members of the avant-garde; Cecil Taylor confesses a Silver influence, and trumpeter Dave Douglas played briefly in a Silver combo.

Silver recorded exclusively for Blue Note until that label's eclipse in the late '70s, whereupon he started his own label, Silveto. Silver's '80s work was poorly distributed. During that time he began writing lyrics to his compositions; his work began to display a concern with music's metaphysical powers, as exemplified by album titles like Music to Ease Your Disease and Spiritualizing the Senses. In the '90s, Silver abandoned his label venture and began recording for Columbia. With his re-emergence on a major label, Silver is once again receiving a measure of the attention his contribution deserves. Certainly, no one has ever contributed a larger and more vital body of original compositions to the jazz canon. ~ Chris Kelsey” – Blue Note Records

Item description:

Artist:

Horace Silver Quintet

Title:

Song For My Father

Label:

Music Matters / Blue Note

Format:

2 × Vinyl, LP, 45 RPM, Limited Edition, Reissue, Remastered, Stereo, 180 Gram

Pressing:

US

Release Date:

This reissue: 2010 | Original - 1964

Genre:

Jazz

Style:

Hard Bop

Catalog No:

MMBST-84185

Condition:

New