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Music Matters / Blue Note

Dexter Gordon – Doin' Allright | 45rpm 2LP

$90.00

Music Matters / Blue Note

Dexter Gordon – Doin' Allright | 45rpm 2LP

$90.00

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“Dexter Gordon always played with a melancholy smile in his sound. The joy he felt in playing his tenor saxophone was apparent, as was his huge tone and playful conception. At the time that he recorded Doin' All Right, his very first Blue Note album, Dex had a reason to be smiling. Gordon was making a major comeback after spending several years in prison on a narcotics conviction. After being one of the primary pacesetters among tenors during the bebop era, Dex had been largely forgotten in the 1950s due to several other periods of involuntary incarceration. But after the release of this 1961 album with the young trumpet sensation Freddie Hubbard and the Horace Parlan Trio, Dexter was here to stay. Just listen to him caressing "You've Changed," introducing "Society Red" (which 15 years later would be used in his famous film Round Midnight) and sounding jubilant on "I Was Doing All Right." Dexter Gordon was feeling joyful, feeling healthy and content to let every note tell the story. Doin’ All Right is Dexter Gordon creating music for the ages!” - Music Matters

"Society Red," the second Gordon original, is a relaxed, yet powerful, blues that first hands the solo reins to Hubbard. He's in no hurry to jolt the listener, but rides the relaxed vibe awhile. Soon, however, he enters his familiar blowing terrain, spitting piercing shots to the heavens. Gordon revisits some of these volleys with a deeper, warmer sound and the occasional growl. Much as in the album's opener, he steadily builds his story, ever filling the available space with more information—more details—without ever disrupting the flow, like a boxer expertly working the speed bag. Parlan applies a soft, rolling touch, skewing the blues into an abstract take on ragtime. This nice recollection of jazz's first steps gives way to bassist George Andrew Tucker's only individual statement on the record: a loping bend to the space-time continuum. - All About Jazz

Musicians:

  • Dexter Gordon, tenor sax
  • Al Harewood, drums
  • Freddie Hubbard, trumpet
  • Horace Parlan, piano
  • George Tucker, bass

 

About Dexter Gordon:

“Dexter Gordon had such a colorful and eventful life (with three separate comebacks) that his story would make a great Hollywood movie. The top tenor saxophonist to emerge during the bop era and possessor of his own distinctive sound, Gordon sometimes was long-winded and quoted excessively from other songs, but he created a large body of superior work and could battle nearly anyone successfully at a jam session. His first important gig was with Lionel Hampton (1940-1943) although, due to Illinois Jacquet also being in the sax section, Gordon did not get any solos. In 1943, he did get to stretch out on a recording session with Nat King Cole. Short stints with Lee Young, the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra, and Louis Armstrong's big band preceded his move to New York in December 1944 and becoming part of Billy Eckstine's Orchestra, trading off with Gene Ammons on Eckstine's recording of "Blowin' the Blues Away." Gordon recorded with Dizzy Gillespie ("Blue 'N' Boogie") and as a leader for Savoy before returning to Los Angeles in the summer of 1946. He was a major part of the Central Avenue scene, trading off with Wardell Gray and Teddy Edwards in many legendary tenor battles; studio recordings of "The Chase" and "The Duel" helped to document the atmosphere of the period.

After 1952, drug problems resulted in some jail time and periods of inactivity during the '50s (although Gordon did record two albums in 1955). By 1960, he was recovered and soon he was recording a consistently rewarding series of dates for Blue Note. Just when he was regaining his former popularity, in 1962 Gordon moved to Europe where he would stay until 1976. While on the continent, he was in peak form and Gordon's many SteepleChase recordings rank with the finest work of his career. Gordon did return to the U.S. on an occasional basis, recording in 1965, 1969-1970, and 1972, but he was to an extent forgotten in his native land. It was therefore a major surprise that his return in 1976 was treated as a major media event. A great deal of interest was suddenly shown in the living legend with long lines of people waiting at clubs in order to see him. Gordon was signed to Columbia and remained a popular figure until his gradually worsening health made him semi-active by the early '80s. His third comeback occurred when he was picked to star in the motion picture 'Round Midnight. Gordon's acting was quite realistic and touching. He was nominated for an Academy Award, four years before his death after a very full life. Most of Dexter Gordon's recordings for Savoy, Dial, Bethlehem, Dootone, Jazzland, Blue Note, SteepleChase, Black Lion, Prestige, Columbia, Who's Who, Chiaroscuro, and Elektra Musician are currently available. ~ Scott Yanow” – Blue Note Records

 

Item description:

Artist:

Dexter Gordon

Title:

Doin' Allright

Label:

Music Matters / Blue Note

Format:

2 × Vinyl, LP, Album, 45 RPM, Reissue, Remastered, Gatefold

Pressing:

US

Release Date:

This reissue: 2009 | Original - 1961

Genre:

Jazz

Style:

Hard Bop

Catalog No:

MMBST 84077

Condition:

New