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Collector Series - Treasure Hunting with an Itch

Collector Series - Treasure Hunting with an Itch

There are many different motivations for Vinyl collectors out there from the purist who believes vinyl LPs reign above all, the librarian who loves archiving and finding the rarest, the casual who collects records every now and then or the musical conductor, aka the DJ who finds joy in presenting their valuable finds. Everything comes from the sheer love of music, and Ichiro (aka Itch) is all of the above in our opinion.

The motivation to do what they do as vinyl collectors give the musical journey a sort of focus, allowing one to learn from the chosen path. It can be broad, it can be zoned in or even both, no matter what there's always something to take away! So let's dig into the mind of collector DJ Itch and see where this mystical motivation comes from and leads to.

Hi Itch! Thank you for doing this interview, could we start off with just a little bit about yourself? 

Hi Analog Vault, thank you for asking me for this interview.  I’m Itch, a DJ and a vinyl collector, and have been actively collecting vinyls inspired by the passion for “local exotic funk a-go-go” music from the ’60s to early ’80s in Singapore, Nusantara, and around the region. The music genres I’ve been collecting are A-Go-Go, Hala-Hala, Melayu-Indo grooves, Chinese Disco, Pop Yeh Yeh, Asian City-pop, and so on.  My DJ set specializes in Asian sound and exotic music introducing forgotten local music gems from the past to modern listeners, and brings back nostalgic vibes for old-timers. My vinyl collection journey started from early 2017 when I visit Red Point Record Warehouse to purchase some second-hand Jazz or relaxing music vinyls.  But, the owner recommended me to listen to locally produced funky music, and when I listened to it first, it was quite an addictive exotic funky tune that I haven’t heard before. From that day, my digging journey of local gems has started.

* Treasure Hunting with an Itch - Photo Credit Rizman Putra 

Yes! we have always noticed your great collection of rare South-east Asian titles from attending some of your gigs! Could you expand a little more about this particular interest and what is your motivation behind this research initiative?

My interest came from after knowing about a Golden Era of Music scene back in 60s/70s Singapore.  For many years, I’ve been listening to many kinds of music, and always enjoyed listening to Jazz or Motown soul music in 70s, but I didn’t know much about the same era music scene in Singapore. This curiosity motivated me to start listening to those music from online or YouTube.  The vinyl collection of South-East Asian vinyls started when my DJ friend from Japan, Yohei Hasegawa, introduced me to vintage record shop in Singapore, which also helped me to open my journey of digging “local exotic funk a-go-go” vinyl records!

*Recent finds of SEA titles by Itch 

1. Saloma - Entah Di-Mana EP

*Recent finds of SEA titles by Itch 

2. Mahani Mohd & Jopie - 1000th Ku Nantikan

With that in mind, how do you go about choosing which ones go into your record bag and which ones remain when digging for SEA titles? Is there a particular mood or sound that you usually look for?  

Choosing vinyl is the most difficult part. When you start digging, I just look through the shelves randomly and check any title I’ve been searching for.  If I find it, those will straight go into my record bag!  If not, I sometimes ask the shop owner for any recommendation or new stock, then search from that stack.  But my budget is limited on one visit, so I just select those which can be used in the DJ event. The interesting part of digging is to find the dope groove music from the cheaper second-hand records!  I try not to buy the expensive one. When I go digging, I just focus on the music produced in 60s to 80s from around the region which can be used on my DJ mix.  Recently, I’ve been listening to soul and funk music from Malaysia in 70s, and there many wonderful covers and original songs.

We are also curious as to how you would organize them in your own personal space. Would it be by the era, style, mood, or region?? It's always nice to have a system in place for easier navigation especially for a DJ like yourself.

Never knew that my record collection can become so big in three years, and its always problematic to organize these records in my space.  Currently I organize by its region (Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Japanese, others), then after that will put those in alphabetical order or its musical style.  Otherwise, it’s difficult to remember where I put the vinyls.  But, usually I always keep my favorite vinyls in my DJ bag, so I can listen to it anytime!



Apart from that, we also realized your love for Japanese City-pop and Funk, where you also have your very own night called “NightCap”. Could you tell us a bit about what the style means to you and maybe one of your favorite City-pop albums for a much-suggested listening.

Yes, “Nightcap”, my monthly night at White Label Records, is a good platform to introduce some of my favorite Japanese City-pop music mixed with Malay Funk or Nanyang Chinese Disco. Am happy that this monthly event turned one in February! As an Asian rare groove DJ, and as a Japanese, I wanted to share some of my Japanese rare groove music collection (Japanese Funk & Japanese city-pop).  Some funk and boogie music produced in Japan have great vibes!  Tatsuro Yamashita’s “Sparkle” (included in the LP album ‘For You’) and Miki Matsubara’s “Stay With Me” (EP) have been played every time at “Nightcap”, and always happy to see the audience singing together!  My favorite City-pop albums will be Tatsuro Yamashita’s “SPACY”, Ruriko Ohgami’s “Typhoon Lady”, Taeko Ohnuki’s “Sunshower”, and so on…

2. Takako Mamiya - Love Trip


We are always fascinated with collectors who purposefully dig for old records that are super rare to find, it's almost like a treasure hunt. Could you share a little about your focus on your musical journey recently? Is there a DJ / Collector / or ethos that you are inspired by? Maybe one or two rare records that you’ve been wanting to find as well.

Yes, digging vinyls especially the old ones are like treasure hunt! Recently, I’ve been focused on more Malay and Singapore soul and funk from 70s and 80s; Ahmad Nawab, Uji Rashid, Rahimah Rahim, Sharifah Aini, Anita Sarawak, Carefree, Flybaits, etc).  Their music has wonderful soul, groove, and boogie with a bit of exoticness, and they can blend well with Japanese City-pop at my events.

I was first inspired by NADA, a sound duo comprised by Safuan Johari and Rizman Putra, who reinterpret Malaysian traditional music with modern technology. I learned a lot about 60s to 80s Malaysian music from them and inspired me to DJ.  Then, I always get inspired by music selection by my favourite DJs, Iramamama, Vinylheavy, Tiko Disko, Yuichi Kishino, Hibiki Tokiwa, Yohei Hasegawa, etc.. Their music help expand my music knowledge about Asian music!

To end it off, We would like to say that you are one of the rare music lovers out there with such a sincere and genuine approach. Each record probably brings its own memories and experience back to you. Could you maybe tell us what do these records mean to you at the end of the day and how does it gel into your everyday life? 

From these vintage records, each record has its own music culture history and these music brings back the vibes from those era into our daily life.  Besides the music, the design or fashion from those era can be seen from the vinyl record, which is interesting part of the vinyl digging experience!  Singapore has developed and changed very fast, but through the vinyl record I still can see how Singapore was before.  Each vinyl has its own history and story.

A mix by DJ Itch for our Mix series - Providing an all Vinyl mix, picking flavours from the South-East Asian Region, songs and melodies that are nostalgic to all of us here.

- The End -

Thank you Itch for taking your time off and shining some light onto some of these musical gems. By doing this interview it has inspired us to always keep the musical search going! So much to learn from the past and so much to look forward to at the same time. Hopefully through reading this, it will inspire you to go on your own musical search and continue to keep your curious nature alive. Keep the fire burning :) 

You can find out more about DJ Itch aka Ichiro via the mediums below! Please also check out his weekly mix that he has been doing during the Circuit Break era called "Stay Home Singapura". We Highly recommend to put them on for some time travels and spot on vibes. 

Mixcloud: 

https://www.mixcloud.com/itchirology/

Instagram: 

https://www.instagram.com/itch_sg/

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/itchirology/

@Itch_sg

Collector Series - Arranging with CK

Collector Series - Arranging with CK

Organizing one's record collection is a very personal experience, which helps give the collector a sense of solace, making the whole listening experience a much more enjoyable one. It almost feels like you’re arranging your musical memories into nursing homes, each LP waiting to be discharged at ease. Now is a perfect time to arrange your collection so let us dig into the mind of collector CK on how he arranges them. 

So CK, let us start with a little about yourself, and how long have you been collecting records?

I am a happy husband and a father of a 10-year old boy. I started to fall in love with music after discovering my dad’s cassette tapes when I was 8 years old. The music from Michael Jackson, Bonny M, Elton John, etc just brought out my long-lasting passion for music. Collecting music in its physical form has always been my greatest love. I started by collecting cassette tapes in the 80s. Saving all my pocket money to buy that new album from my favorite band had been a repetitive cycle in my growing up years. After that, like what everyone did at that time, I moved my attention to CDs. It was only till 2012 that I started my vinyl records collecting journey. A good friend of mine was buying a new turntable and I followed him, and it ended up that I got one too for myself. I still remember the first record I have purchased - Nirvana “Nevermind” and since then the desire to own more records just grew stronger and stronger.

Seeing that you have built up a huge record collection over a long time, how do you care for each record individually in terms of storage? I.e inner sleeves and outer sleeves. Where do you usually source them and how important are they to you.

The records are like my babies. I take great care of every single one, putting the vinyl records into anti-static inner sleeves. I do prefer to house them in the Mofi premier inner sleeves but as they are not cheap, I will have to be selective on which one goes into the Mofi sleeves and which one will go into the cheaper rice-paper alternative sleeves. I generally do not prefer to use paper sleeves as they tend to create scuff marks after taking the record in and out. I have also housed the records in a 5mil plastic outer sleeves.


 

What kind of storage do you use to hold your records? The Ikea Kallax seems to be the most popular one for collectors but yours have such a Hogwarts feel going on and we love it! Could you share where did you get them and any advice for storage?

I have used the Kallax for years and they are really good shelves to use for any collectors. However, when I moved to my new place 3 years ago, I realized my childhood dreams of having a tall record storage shelves where I can climb up a ladder to store or pick my records. The shelves were designed by me and built by a local carpenter. I was inspired by a Japanese shelve design where they have this roller mechanism to pull the cover out and lay it down to form an album cover display. I love the concept and discussed it with my local carpenter to build one using a similar approach. The challenging part of the project was the ladder as I wanted to have a single ladder but ended up with two as the movement of the ladder from one side of the shelve to the other side (my shelves are in an “L-shaped” structure) required more space. After all, I am incredibly pleased with the final product!


Speaking about ladders, we were wondering how do you choose which LPs remain at reachable levels and which ones go up to higher levels. Is there a crate for “new arrivals” etc.

Generally, those records that I am very familiar with or I would think that I will listen to less often goes higher up the shelves. I have placed most of the box sets up on the higher shelves as I can locate them easier. The rationale is I do not want to be searching for a particular title or browsing through the titles while on the ladder. I do have a “new arrivals” crate but it is outside in my living hall, next to my sound system. It can store around 40 records. I keep them there so that it is more accessible during my listening session.



How then do you organize your records? Some people like to arrange it via genres, alphabetical order, moods for certain periods, or even eras. Which do you prefer, is it a combination, and how does it make sense to you?

I have recently made some changes to my organization. I have grouped them in different forms, first I have alphabetized the Funk & Soul, Jazz  (Instrumental vs Vocals), Heavy Metal/Punk and Hip-hop (these are regardless of eras) titles. Next, I have grouped the records I associated them with the eras (the 80s, 90s, and beyond 2000s). I just grouped them based on which era I started to listen to them, this means I will have a Depeche Mode “Delta Machine” (released in 2013) in the 80s section as I have always associated Depeche Mode as the band I listen to in the 80s. I have also grouped some of the series I have collected together, like the Late Night Tales, Peel sessions, The Mood Mosaic series, Now That’s What I called Music, etc. There are also specific artists or bands that I am fond of collecting, like Miles Davis, Prince, The Housemartins/Beautiful South, and these are placed separately. I have also organized the rest in “Classic Rock Bands” (e.g. Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, etc), “Classic Male Artistes” (e.g. Paul Simon, Billy Joel, etc) and “Classic Female Artistes” (Joni Mitchelle, Dusty Springfield, etc). Last but not least, I have my “Mofi Titles”, “Soundtracks”, “Chinese Music” and “World Music” sections.    

Mobile Fidelity Section

Recently we just learned that mono cartridges will be damaged when used to play stereo records. If so, do you separate your mono records from stereo? Since we are at it, which do you prefer anyways?

I don’t separate my mono records from the stereos. Currently, I do not have a mono cartridge but I am very keen to set up a turntable with a mono cartridge after hearing the beauty of a mono record played on a mono cartridge in a shop at Adelphi. The challenging part is my current turntable does not support two tonearms and this means either I change my turntable, or I will have to get another one for mono. I am still thinking about this at the moment.

Lastly, how often do you arrange your records and what does it mean for you? It’s a long process but I've got a feeling that it must be a therapeutic one, looking through each cover and the memories they entail. Maybe could you also share a particular section of your collection that you find yourself always going back to the most?

I must be honest that I can be a little messy when it comes to organizing and arranging my records. I tried to do it after every listening session if I can so that I will not misplace them after some time. It can be quite frustrating if you want to listen to one album for some reason, but you cannot find it in the section you thought you have grouped it under. Yes, it is indeed a therapeutic one to look through each record cover and many of its music will bring back specific memories of my life. My record collection is like a time machine, it has the power and the ability to transport me back to the time. As I grew up in the 80s, I must say that the music from the 80s will have the fondest memories for me in my collection. 

Hopefully, through reading this, it will inspire you to start arranging your record collection however you may want. Ultimately, the process of arranging, cleaning, or packing always brings a sense of freshness, like starting a new or giving a new flame to your space. Being sensitive to our spaces and the things we have is always a true blessing to hold.

Thanks, CK for your insight and taking the time off to do this! Stay safe and take care!

You can get more updates from CK via
Insta: https://www.instagram.com/myllck/

Youtube: https://bit.ly/2zZMOXG

- TAV Team

INside: Hail Nothing

INside: Hail Nothing

Photo Credit: Adriel Manoe

In this interview, the duo shed some light INside Hail Nothing, our latest offering on TAV Records.


Photo Credit: Din

"It’s eerily apt––and so surreal––to be releasing HAIL NOTHING in times like these; a time many of us are learning to cope with a very palpable nothingness, day to day. It's an album about embracing the void, dancing in the face of it, and we hope that in whatever funny or tragic or hopefully comforting way it helps you tide over these bleak months.- .gif

What was the writing and production process like for Hail Nothing and how would that compare to how you approached things for Soma?

Weish: We started way back in 2016, but hit bumps and lulls along the way. We perpetually had too many half-developed tracks but not enough time to complete them––we’d been travelling and gigging a lot, and got involved in a bunch of challenging projects and collaborations. By the time we sat down to revisit old sketches, nothing sounded fresh or exciting anymore.

So we decided to start from scratch. Hail Nothing was much more deliberate than Soma, both in concept and process. Production and recording were far more gruelling, too. 

Production with Jason was this ongoing conversation, with multiple revisions and new approaches to each track along the way. We love the way he used some of his own analog synths, too –– to layer over, counterpoint and complement our synths, which gave everything this raw human touch and unpredictability. It all culminated in this stark, aggressive sound that we were hoping to achieve, and more.

Vocals on past records were all done in my bedroom, where I was my own recording engineer (and worst critic). I could do hundreds of takes and cheekily patch in phrases I wanted re-sung. But this time Jason constructed a booth for me at his place, and limited me to very few takes and no punch–ins. Some of my vocal melodies have strange off–rhythms that don’t sit within the beat, and I had trouble memorising those idiosyncrasies (even though they were my own) in order to sing perfect harmonies or doubles over. I’m a nervous wreck and a perfectionist so it was quite a nightmare for me, but Jason managed to calm me and be firm with me all at once.

The entire album sounds so concise, how long was the writing process for you guys and how did you decide on the direction of the record? 

Din: “Let’s Go” was the first to be written fully and considered for the album –– I remember writing the synths for “Let’s Go” after watching Stranger Things and being blown away by the theme. From the first draft of that, to recording the last bit of vocals on “My Darling”… the whole process spanned about 4 years.

It helped that we finally decided to throw out all our folders of old ideas, and start on a blank slate. We wrote with a single vision, as opposed to earlier releases which sometimes felt like a collection of arbitrary songs we happened to have lying around.

But honestly, a big reason why everything sounds so coherent and the direction so clear, is Jason. He played a tremendous role in pushing us and reminding us what we wanted the album to convey, and with what sonic language. That’s the magic of having a producer like him. Not only is he a technical whiz, he also helped shape the overall sound. 


Pretty crazy to be releasing this right now. How were you feeling about the record as it developed? Any stand out moments?

Din: Honestly I think we were getting a bit tired of the material at some point, heh. At the time we just wanted to just release whatever we had. It was when Jason convinced Weish to re–record her vocals at a higher fidelity that things started to change I think. We buckled down to record and produce everything proper in 2019 and worked with Jason till like 2am almost every day. As we did that and heard everything being put together, it kind of renewed our faith in our own music, because we started to see (or hear rather) how nicely everything was coming together.


Very fresh collaborators here too, with Bani Haykal on the first track and Usaama Minhas on B2. How did each of these come about? 

Din: We’d always wanted to work with Bani Haykal. We’re both big fans of B-Quartet, and all of Bani Haykal’s projects, really. I remember ages ago when we were first starting out, we joked that the ultimate dream would be to collaborate with him––it was so funny at the time because we thought it was impossible. Fast forward 6 years, and we have “Only Yours”.

Weish: We met Usaama when we were playing in Cambridge a couple of years ago. He did a spoken word set so charged with conviction and emotion and artistry it made me cry. Like, sob.

Din: We stuck around after to tell him how much we loved it. He didn’t realise that we were also on the lineup and was getting ready to leave because he had to drive back up to... London, I think. He only stayed when he realised we were up next on the lineup. I think he enjoyed the set and we hung out for a bit after, and we’ve stayed in touch ever since!


Fantastic artwork too from Marc Gabriel Loh who also worked on the cover for Soma. The theme spills over really nicely too, how and why did you decide to do this? 

Weish: We really owe it to Marc for being so relentless in his pursuit of capturing the album’s essence. He went through so many rounds of drafts––all of which I loved and was happy to run with––but it took him quite a while to be happy with his own approach.

He wanted to convey the religious (well, more like a-religious) overtones in Hail Nothing –– our surrender to, almost worship of, nothingness… which was quite a recurring motif in the lyrics. So he decided to employ a visual language commonly associated with religious iconography –– the gold ornamental framing of the subject, etc. Cleverly, that also doubles up as a changing room divider for the women –– striking a paradoxical balance between the grandiosity of “Hail” and the silent, domestic vulnerability of “Nothing”. 

And these are the same women from old Shanghainese posters that he drew on for Soma –– he wanted to find some continuity with the previous record, since we’d still retained that raw, personal voice. This time, though, he glitched out their faces, rendering their identities irrelevant –– exactly the kind of erasure and emptiness that we wanted to express in the music.

He also added the “ø” –– the null or “empty set” symbol, which was such a nice touch.

Lastly, any shoutouts or people you'd like to thank for this? 

Of course. We cannot thank these people enough –– 

You guys, for putting faith in us and releasing our very first vinyl;
Jason Tan, our incredible producer;
Jonathan Kiat, Safuan Johari and our Syndicate fam for all the gruelling work;
Marc Gabriel Loh for engaging with the album so deeply;
Bani Haykal and Usaama Minhas for their special voices;
Lucius Yeo and Natasha Loh for their help in promoting the album;
Spotify Asia, Sarah Sim and her team for their support;
National Arts Council Singapore, for their patience and generosity;

And of course, all you listeners out there who have been showing the record so much love. It really means the world to us.



Listen to 'Songs that made Hail Nothing', a playlist by .gif:




Order your copy of Hail Nothing online: 
https://theanalogvault.com/products/gif-hailnothingpre-order

Vinyl Mix - The Analog Vault Selectors

A vinyl only mix by The Analog Vault selectors at The Hive (Carpenter Street) for Sights and Sounds 2018.

All tracks present in the mix are titles available at The Analog Vault - taking you on a journey through psychedelic selections and spiritual vibes. Featuring the likes of Dorothy Ashby, Minami Deutsch, Phil Ranelin, Midori Takada, Uniting of Opposites among others.

Bandwagon Asia: A beginner's guide to buying a record player

Bandwagon Asia: A beginner's guide to buying a record player

For a good read on how to start on you music analog journey, check out Bandwagon Asia's beginner's guide to buying a record player / turntable here, which saw our curator contributing to. 

Not to mention that we also sell Audio Technica turntables here at The Analog Vault. Do come by to our retail store at the Esplanade to check out the special deals we offer with purchase of turntables at our brick-and-mortar store. You can also check them out online here.

TRIBE Music Market by Revision Music & Ice Cream Sundays

TRIBE Music Market by Revision Music & Ice Cream Sundays

Last weekend, we joined our buddies from Revision Music as a vendor at their bi-monthly music market at Camp Kilo Charcoal Club. Among us was a variety of music labels, collectives, artistes, and record enthusiasts at the affair, such as Vinyl HeavyStraits Records, Analog Paralog, We Love Jazz, Choice Cuts, Nocturnal Society, Kilas and Darker Than Wax.

The event was a collaboration with Ice Cream Sundays, who inevitably brought the cream with Popbar and the boogie with resident DJs Toppings and Bongomann. The DJ lineup was completed with the Revision Music trio; RAH, RTJ and Senja. Couldn't have been more perfect.

We brought a selection of records, books and magazines to the affair and had such a fun time with the kindest people and the friendliest vibes. Smiles for miles. Watch this space and be sure to join us at the next one! For now, here are some snaps, courtesy of Debbie Y:

















Buro 24/7: Where to find Vinyl in Singapore

Buro 24/7: Where to find Vinyl in Singapore

"What's in a local vinyl shop? Check out the best vinyl stores in Singapore to pick up a crate or chat with sound hounds"

Check out Buro 24/7's latest 2018 guide on record stores in Singapore, featuring The Analog Vault amongst others.

Explore the article here, with the excerpt on The Analog Vault as written below.

"THE ANALOG VAULT

The Analog Vault is a three-year-old shop founded by Eugene Ow Young and Sharon Seet in 2015. While she's also from the finance industry, curator and co-founder Seet juggles her day job with her passion-project. The Analog Vault promotes vinyl records, indie artistes and a love for music.

If you listen to...
Jazz, hip-hop, electronic, modern/experimental classical, and World music. 30 to 50 new titles are added monthly across the genres. "Apart from bringing in titles by highly-regarded artists or from established labels in the respective genres, we are also focused on selecting well-crafted albums by emerging or underrated artists, which we believe should be introduced to a wider music audience," said Seet.

And also like...
In-store live performances that introduce budding artists from all music styles. Previous editions were graced by Hanging Up The Moon, Sobs, Semut Semut, Specific Islander, as well as DJs/producers Intriguant, Ramesh, Darker Than Wax, Ponzi, and Kiri. "We tend to invite musicians and DJs who are pushing new sounds and concepts, and aim to provide a music and broadcasting avenue for their creativity and artistic expressions," said Seet. The store also sells turntables from Audio-Technica and music books.

The store's most prized possession is...
"We have a Bill Evans 11-album box set released by the US-based audiophile label Analogue Productions that retails for just above a thousand dollars. Bill Evans is considered to be one of the best jazz pianists and composers of all time, and this box set includes his highly acclaimed albums Waltz for Debby, Sunday At The Village Vanguard, Moonbeams, amongst others, cut in 45 RPM audiophile quality," said Seet.

Don't leave without
"Kind of Blue by Miles Davis, often referred to as the definitive jazz album," said Seet. "Miles Davis was one of the greatest jazz trumpeters and composers, and another hallmark of this album was that accompanying Miles were other jazz legends — Bill Evans and Wynton Kelly on piano, John Coltrane and Cannonball Adderley on saxophone. The musicality, artistry and improvisation on this album is just pure genius at work," she added.

The Analog Vault, #02-10, Esplanade Mall, 8 Raffles Avenue, Singapore 039802."

The Analog Room OutIn 007 with Intriguant | 30th June 2018, Saturday

The Analog Room OutIn 007 with Intriguant | 30th June 2018, Saturday

The Analog Room's intimate OutIn series returns this June with a solo live set from Singapore-based electronic beatsmith Intriguant. Join us as he improvises over tracks from "Recluse" as well as more unreleased material on Saturday, June 30, 5 to 6 p.m.

Intriguant has been having quite a year since the release of his full-length debut “Recluse” in 2017, collaborating with a slew of musicians and visual artists on impressive projects such as Temporal and iLight Marina Bay. OutIn has him in a much cosier setting, so come hang out, enjoy great music, complimentary drinks and excellent vinyl offerings.

About Intriguant:
Intriguant is a Singapore-based electronic music producer and DJ. Inspired by the human perception of environments, He used textural sounds recorded through the years, and backed them with syncopated beats, fusing the physical with the spiritual.

He released his debut EP Ellipse on the Syndicate label in 2014. Ellipse found Intriguant acclaim with critics spanning Israel, Slovakia, and the US. For the title track off the EP, He collaborated with label mate Brandon Tay to produce a music video that found favour with respected music magazine, The Fader (NYC).

 

Intriguant Recluse Album Vinyl Singapore

 

Intriguant Recluse Album Vinyl Singapore

His debut full-length album, “Recluse” was released in 2017 under the Singapore-based audiovisual label, Syndicate with acclaim from a global audience (ranging from USA, UK, Australia, Japan, Hong Kong, Manila (PH)). Featuring other artists from Singapore, the album as an entity explores the notion of loneliness and self-discovery.

Recluse was mastered by Conrad Magabo at Cosmic Zoo, Los Angeles. For his contribution to film, theatre and art installation include Uniqlo Singapore in-store Music, Singapore Inside Out: Tokyo and I Light Festival 2018. He has shared the stage with luminaries such as Thomas Schumacher (GER), Teebs, Flying Lotus (Brainfeeder, USA), Homeboy Sandman, Samiyam (Stones Throw Records, USA) and Daddy Kev, D-Styles (Low End Theory LA, USA). He has also performed at music festivals including St. Jerome Laneway Festival and SingJazz Festival.

About The Analog Room by The Analog Vault:
The Analog Room is the new retail and event space concept by the team behind The Analog Vault. In addition to providing for the expansion of The Analog Vault’s existing retail space, The Analog Room features a superlative analog sound system, DJ console, and whisky tasting bar. It plays host to a plethora of events, such as its monthly in-store performance series 'OutIn', audiophile listening events, DJ sessions, music education workshops, and whisky tasting events. The Analog Room is situated at #02-10 in the Esplanade Mall, just adjacent to The Analog Vault.

About The Analog Vault:
Founded in 2015, The Analog Vault has become one of the go-to places for jazz, audiophile, hip-hop, electronic music, and indie aficionados alike in Singapore. The team behind The Analog Vault are ardent champions of the analog music culture, and strongly believe that listening to music on vinyl via an analog sound system is one of the best ways to enjoy good music. Our goal is to establish The Analog Vault to be Asia’s leading proponent of analog music culture and fine music, as well as Asia’s leading retailer of vinyl records.

About OutIn:
OutIn is The Analog Room’s signature in-store live performance series for progressive, challenging and relevant underground music of all genres and localities. We invite DJs and musicians who are pushing new sounds and concepts and provide a music and broadcasting avenue for their creativity and artistic expression.

The Analog Room OutIn 006 with Hanging Up The Moon | 19th May 2018

The Analog Room OutIn 006 with Hanging Up The Moon | 19th May 2018

The Analog Room's in-store live performance series OutIn is happening on 19 May (Saturday), 5 to 6 p.m., this time with a rare solo acoustic set and vinyl record signing session by Hanging Up The Moon (HUTM). Join us for an intimate lead-up to the official launch of HUTM's well-received fourth and latest album, “It’s All Here Somewhere”, happening on 27 July at the Esplanade Recital Studio. Complimentary drinks, courtesy of The Analog Vault. Admission is free.


About the album:

"In typical fashion, Sean Lam explores the deeply personal in Hanging Up The Moon’s fourth and latest album. Just like nothing that happens is ever lost if you hold it in your mind, “It’s All Here Somewhere” is a repository of poignant memories, unspoken fears, faltering hope.


Sean is joined once again by long-time collaborators Alexius Cai, Dean Aziz and Victor Low. “It’s All Here Somewhere” also features Darren Ng (SONICBRAT) and Andy Chia (SA) on selected tracks." — https://www.hangingupthemoon.com

About Hanging Up The Moon:

Hanging Up The Moon started off as the solo project of Sean Lam, ex-frontman of Concave Scream, one of Singapore's pioneer indie bands. Recorded entirely in his study in the wee hours of the morning, the self-titled debut album was a stripped-down affair, its quiet sound captivating both critics and listeners alike.
In the albums that followed, Hanging Up The Moon explored different soundscapes with the help of good friends and fellow veterans of the local music scene: Alexius Cai (Piblokto), Dean Aziz (Concave Scream), Leslie Low (The Observatory) and Victor Low (Affixen).

The band has since released 2 vinyl LPs and is currently preparing for the launch of "It's All Here Somewhere", Hanging Up The Moon's fourth and latest album. Just like nothing that happens is ever lost if you hold it in your mind, "It's All Here Somewhere" is a repository of poignant memories, unspoken fears, faltering hope.

Sean is joined once again by long-time collaborators Alexius Cai, Dean Aziz and Victor Low. "It's All Here Somewhere" also features Darren Ng (SONICBRAT) and Andy Chia (SA) on selected tracks.

About The Analog Room by The Analog Vault:
The Analog Room is the new retail and event space concept by the team behind The Analog Vault. In addition to providing for the expansion of The Analog Vault’s existing retail space, The Analog Room features a superlative analog sound system, DJ console, and whisky tasting bar. It plays host to a plethora of events, such as its monthly in-store performance series 'OutIn', audiophile listening events, DJ sessions, music education workshops, and whisky tasting events. The Analog Room is situated at #02-10 in the Esplanade Mall, just adjacent to The Analog Vault.

About The Analog Vault:
Founded in 2015, The Analog Vault has become one of the go-to places for jazz, audiophile, hip-hop, electronic music, and indie aficionados alike in Singapore. The team behind The Analog Vault are ardent champions of the analog music culture, and strongly believe that listening to music on vinyl via an analog sound system is one of the best ways to enjoy good music. Our goal is to establish The Analog Vault to be Asia’s leading proponent of analog music culture and fine music, as well as Asia’s leading retailer of vinyl records.

About OutIn:
OutIn is The Analog Room’s signature in-store live performance series for progressive, challenging and relevant underground music of all genres and localities. We invite DJs and musicians who are pushing new sounds and concepts and provide a music and broadcasting avenue for their creativity and artistic expression.

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